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Frozen Shoulder-Definition-Causes-Risk factors

Definition

Frozen shoulder, commonly known as adhesive capsulitis, is a shoulder joint pathology. Adhesive capsulitis develops when the capsule that surrounds the shoulder joint swells and tightens. Due to which joint become stiffen, painful and normal functioning of shoulder become disturbed. Because of the severe pain and limited range of motion, getting dressed and reaching for things may become challenging. Depending on the cause, disease progression might be gradual or abrupt. If left untreated, symptoms may worsen over time, resulting in severe pain and limited range of motion.

Frozen Shoulder Causes

Here are some of the potential causes of frozen shoulder:

Inflammation

It often occurs after a shoulder injury or surgery, which can lead to inflammation and swelling in the shoulder joint. This inflammation can cause the formation of scar tissue in the joint capsule, which can restrict the shoulder’s range of motion.

Autoimmune disorders

Some autoimmune disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis, can cause inflammation in the shoulder joint, which can lead to this disease.

Diabetes

Individuals with diabetes are more likely to develop this condition. High blood sugar levels can cause damage to the shoulder joint, leading to inflammation and scarring. Sugar crystals deposits in joint due to which movement become painful.

Immobilization of shoulder joint

Prolonged immobilization or reduced mobility of the shoulder joint, such as after surgery, injury, or stroke, can lead to the development of condition.

Genetics

There may be a genetic predisposition, as it has been observed to run in families.

Overuse of the shoulder

Overuse of the shoulder joint, such as from repetitive overhead activities, can lead to inflammation and damage in the shoulder joint, which ultimately leads to shoulder joint become frozen.

Injury or trauma to shoulder joint

Direct injury or trauma to shoulder can damage the capsule causing inflammation which can lead to adhesive capsulitis.

Hormonal imbalances

Certain hormonal imbalances, such as thyroid disorders, can increase the risk.

It’s important to note that some people may develop frozen shoulder without an apparent cause. Additionally, having one or more of these risk factors does not guarantee that an individual will develop adhesive capsulitis. However, being aware of these potential causes can help individuals take steps to reduce their risk and manage any underlying conditions that may increase their likelihood of developing frozen shoulder.

Frozen Shoulder Risk Factors

Age

Commonly effects people between the ages 40 and 60 years old. Age causes degenerative changes in older people.

Gender

Women are more likely to develop this disease than men.

Medical conditions

Certain medical conditions, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, thyroid disorders, Parkinson’s disease, and stroke, can increase the risk of developing frozen shoulder.

Reduced mobility

Reduced mobility of the joint, such as after surgery, injury, or stroke, can increase the risk of developing frozen shoulder.

Shoulder trauma

Trauma to the  joint, such as from a fall or accident, can be considered as the significant risk factor for frozen shoulder.

Repetitive overhead movements of the shoulder

Repetitive overhead activities, can lead to inflammation and damage in the shoulder joint, increasing the risk of developing disease.

Genetics

There may be a genetic predisposition to developing adhesive capsulitis, as it has been observed to run in families.

 

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