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 Knee Osgood-Schlatter Disease Physical Therapy Treatment: How to Recover Faster

Treatment for Knee Osgood-Schlatter Disease

There is no cure for knee Osgood-Schlatter disease, but the condition usually improves on its own as the child grows and the skeleton matures. However, physical therapy can play a vital role in helping to manage the symptoms and speed up recovery.

Physical Therapy Treatment for Knee Osgood-Schlatter Disease

Physical therapy treatment for knee Osgood-Schlatter disease typically includes:

  • Rest and ice: Resting the knee and applying ice to the affected area can help to reduce pain and inflammation.
  • Stretching: Stretching the muscles around the knee can help to improve range of motion and reduce muscle tightness.
  • Strengthening exercises: Strengthening exercises for the quadriceps and hamstring muscles can help to support the knee joint and reduce stress on the patellar tendon.
  • Balance and coordination exercises: Balance and coordination exercises can help to improve proprioception, which is the body’s awareness of its position in space. This can help to reduce the risk of re-injury.
Knee Osgood-Schlatter Disease Physical Therapy Treatment, exercise name, sets and repetition.

Hamstring Stretch | 3 | 10-15 |

Instructions:

  1. Stand facing a wall with your hands on the wall at shoulder height.
  2. Step back with one leg until your knee is straight and your heel is flat on the ground.
  3. Keep your back straight and your front leg bent at the knee.
  4. Lean forward until you feel a stretch in the back of your thigh.
  5. Hold the stretch for 30 seconds.
  6. Repeat steps 2-5 with your other leg.

Quadriceps Stretch | 3 | 10-15 |

Instructions:

  1. Stand facing a chair or wall for balance.
  2. Bend one leg behind you and grab your foot with your hand.
  3. Gently pull your heel towards your buttock.
  4. Keep your back straight and your front knee straight.
  5. Hold the stretch for 30 seconds.
  6. Repeat steps 2-5 with your other leg.

Calf Stretch | 3 | 10-15

| Instructions:

  1. Stand facing a wall with your hands on the wall at shoulder height.
  2. Place one leg in front of the other with your back heel raised off the ground.
  3. Keep your back heel down and your front knee bent.
  4. Lean forward until you feel a stretch in the back of your calf.
  5. Hold the stretch for 30 seconds.
  6. Repeat steps 2-5 with your other leg.

Wall Squats | 3 | 10-15 |

Instructions:

  1. Stand with your back against a wall and your feet shoulder-width apart.
  2. Slowly bend your knees until your thighs are parallel to the ground.
  3. Keep your back straight and your core engaged.
  4. Hold the position for 30 seconds.
  5. Slowly return to the starting position.

Step-Downs | 3 | 10-15 |

Instructions:

  1. Stand on a sturdy step or platform.
  2. Step down with one leg until your foot is flat on the ground.
  3. Lower your body until the other knee is bent at a 90-degree angle.
  4. Push up through your heel to return to the starting position.
  5. Repeat steps 2-4 with your other leg.

Eccentric Leg Curls | 3 | 10-15 |

Instructions:

  1. Lie on your back with your knees bent and your feet flat on the ground.
  2. Place a weight band around your ankles.
  3. Slowly raise your legs up towards the ceiling until your knees are fully extended.
  4. Slowly lower your legs back down to the starting position.

Other exercises that may be helpful include:

  • Leg raises
  • Lunges
  • Hip abductor and adductor exercises
  • Balance and coordination exercises

It is important to start slowly with these exercises and gradually increase the intensity and duration as tolerated. Be sure to listen to your body and stop if you feel any pain.

It is also important to warm up before doing these exercises and cool down afterwards. A warm-up can include light cardio and dynamic stretches. A cool-down can include static stretches.

What to Expect During Physical Therapy Treatment for Knee Osgood-Schlatter Disease

Your physical therapist will begin by evaluating your range of motion, strength, and flexibility. They will also ask about your symptoms and activities of daily living.

Based on the evaluation, your physical therapist will develop a personalized treatment plan that may include the following:

  • Stretching exercises: Your physical therapist will teach you how to stretch the muscles around your knee safely and effectively.
  • Strengthening exercises: Your physical therapist will teach you how to strengthen the quadriceps and hamstring muscles around your knee.
  • Balance and coordination exercises: Your physical therapist will teach you balance and coordination exercises to improve proprioception and reduce the risk of re-injury.
  • Manual therapy: Your physical therapist may use manual therapy techniques, such as massage and joint mobilization, to help improve range of motion and reduce pain and inflammation.

How Long Does It Take to Recover from Knee Osgood-Schlatter Disease?

The amount of time it takes to recover from knee Osgood-Schlatter disease varies from person to person. Most people recover within a few months, but some people may experience symptoms for up to a year.

It is important to follow your physical therapist’s instructions and gradually return to your activities as tolerated. Pushing yourself too hard too soon can increase the risk of re-injury.

FAQ

Q: What is the difference between Osgood-Schlatter disease and Sinding-Larsen-Johansson disease?

A: Osgood-Schlatter disease and Sinding-Larsen-Johansson disease are both overuse injuries that affect the patellar tendon. However, Osgood-Schlatter disease affects the tibial tubercle, the bony bump at the top of the shinbone, while Sinding-Larsen-Johansson disease affects the patellar insertion, the point where the patellar tendon attaches to the kneecap.

Q: Can I play sports with Osgood-Schlatter disease?

A: Yes, you can play sports with Osgood-Schlatter disease, but it is important to modify your activities to avoid pain and further injury. Your physical therapist can help you to develop a safe exercise program.

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